Criminal Courts

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Price: $209.00

At the center of the American criminal justice system lies the criminal court system that serves to ensure our community and our society remain protected from both criminals and the law itself. With its unique procedures and processes, the American criminal courts are designed to ensure we have a fair and balanced system for criminal prosecution that focuses primarily on the rights of the accused. As developed over hundreds of years, the criminal codes of both the federal and state governments are adjudicated in separate courts from civil or family controversies given the grave nature of a criminal case. Special judges, lawyers, criminal justice experts, defendants and victims require certain protections that the criminal courts are best suited to provide and ensure that the gravest of legal processes are carried out by experts in these fields.

The legitimacy of American criminal jurisprudence lies in the function and fairness of its criminal courts and students will examine exactly how these institutions uphold the most basic of constitutional rights and values in their daily application. Students will gain a comprehensive understanding of the purpose and function of criminal courts and the prosecution process, jurisdictional requirements and limits, the unique aspects of adjudication and evidence as well as the sentencing of convicted offenders. This course provides students with an overview of the criminal justice system and its processes. It examines the courtroom work group, the trial process, and challenges to the process. It also provides an overview of the juvenile court system.

Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  • Define terms related to criminal courts
  • Describe the impact history has had on the criminal courts
  • Describe how laws are created
  • Explain the relationship between laws and the court system
  • Analyze the court process from the committing of a crime through post convictions
  • Examine how courts operate
  • Differentiate the people involved in the court system
  • Examine juvenile courts